Luftslottet som sprängdes

metaleted:

If theres a new way,
I’ll be the first in line.
But, it better work this time…

mhypomnemata:


And if you must, go to work - tomorrow  Well, if I were you I wouldn’t bother  For there are brighter sides to life  And I should know, because I’ve seen them  But not very often…

- The Smiths, “Still Ill”

mhypomnemata:

And if you must, go to work - tomorrow
Well, if I were you I wouldn’t bother
For there are brighter sides to life
And I should know, because I’ve seen them
But not very often…

- The Smiths, “Still Ill”

im-your-turbo-lover:

He’s a racist piece of shit when it comes to indigenous issues, but cartoonist Garrick Tremaine’s pretty accurate on this one.

im-your-turbo-lover:

He’s a racist piece of shit when it comes to indigenous issues, but cartoonist Garrick Tremaine’s pretty accurate on this one.

serious-kiwi:

New Word

Mal - a - key (noun)

Etymology

Early 21st century, from old French maladies "sickness, illness, disease" (13C), from malade (12C) “doing poorly, feeling sick” , ill-conditioned, from male “badly”, + habitus, past participle of habere, “have, to hold”. Key, from ki, old German, to cleaver, to split (cognates, keil “wedge”, Gothic us-kijans, “come forth”, of seed sprouts, keinan “to germinate”. From Modern English, cockeyed, squint-eyed, figuratively “absurd, askew, crazy”. Also from crikey, a replacement exclamation for “christ”. And hokey pokeynonsense.  American English (1924), malarkey "lies and exaggerations", origin unknown.

From the Hebrew name מַלְאָכִי (Mal’akhiy) meaning “my messenger” or “my angel”. This is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Malachi, which some claim foretells the coming of Christ. In England the name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.

Malakey - Definition 

  1. To come forth with ideas,statements and actions that spread like a disease, like John Key, Prime Minister of New Zealand.
  2. Ill conceived ideas. Normally used by politicians and people in power.
  3. The habit of propagating rumor and laughing it off, in the manner of hokey pokey.
  4. Presenting oneself as an angel, with mal intent.
  5. A religious motivation to change social behavour (see the book of Malachi).

Further reading - see  keynesian economics.